Friday, April 24, 2009

Exactly the kind of Writer Today.com is looking for

Sorry Flit, I couldn't help it. This was a comment left on her http://flitting.org/ site by a new today.com blogger.

Dear ,
Are you against today.com or you want to promote it.It seems that you have promoted a lot today.com and you have provided permanent link to it.Are you planning to delete them in future or keep as it is if yes then you have promoted today.com a lot .
I am totally new to today.com and it seems that you are unhappy with today.com but their terms do not seem to be objectionable they are also online for earning my dear and won't make a bad deal.Furthermore this is called negetive publicity in which you have promoted a lot ,thanks

This is exactly the kind of naive robot that today.com wants in a blogger. It doesn't take well written English to sell a toaster, only a few lines and an affiliate link.

One should always remember that today.com is online for earning money my dear and won't make a bad deal.

Words to live by if I could understand what the hell they meant. I'm not worried about all the negetive publicity we are giving today.com, are you?

When you degrade, devalue, destroy and debilitate your demise is on the horizon.

16 comments:

Phyl April 24, 2009 at 12:50 PM  

won't make a bad dealHm. Indeed. "Because they love us and would never treat us badly. And they know that the only we we will succeed is if we all succeed together."

This is known as "drinking the koolaid."

Shakespeare April 24, 2009 at 12:57 PM  

The question is, will anyone who actually enjoys reading good English even read the blogs after a while, if this is the current example.

Emily Veinglory: April 24, 2009 at 12:58 PM  

Every time someone does that smug "thanks for the bad publicity" meme they should be slapped with a large frozen tuna.

Phyl April 24, 2009 at 1:06 PM  

Yegods, I apologize for the typos in my own comment. I feel like I ought to delete it, ha!

sundcarrie April 24, 2009 at 1:19 PM  

I am not concerned about the negative publicity we are giving them. They had me scared to say anything or even ask a question. When they offered me a way out with my content (I am a pretty new blogger so that was all I had) I took it in a flash!

In Plain English April 24, 2009 at 1:19 PM  

I've got to go shopping for some tuna.

Phyl, at least yours makes sense.

Kelly April 24, 2009 at 10:00 PM  

I had one person tell me on my post about my experience that they had been considering blogging with them and now they won't. If we can help just a few people realize what a mistake it would be to trust them, we have done well.

Isn't the negative publicity the idea here?

Kelly
http://30somethingandsearching.blogspot.com/

flit April 25, 2009 at 12:13 AM  

hope you don't mind that I went into your post and edited the link so that it pointed to the right site, In Plain English :)

Ms Terri April 25, 2009 at 1:11 AM  

Someone buy that blogger a comma.

Actually, he or she is probably a non-native speaker, so I shouldn't poke fun.

But I do think that Today is deliberately trying to recruit bad writers. If you were running a blog network, wouldn't you advertise for "good writers"? But they advertise they want people of "any skill level." Seems like an open invitation to people who either can't write, or just think that they can't. Either way they are more likely to be grateful for the "opportunity" than someone with more skills or confidence.

In Plain English April 25, 2009 at 8:45 AM  

No problem. I'm an idiot about links...never quite know what I'm doing because I write fast and furious. I'm not that easy to offend unless you stop paying me or lock me out of my own damn blog. Hmmm.

flit April 25, 2009 at 10:29 AM  

Perhaps they figure that people are less likely to get distracted from clicking on the ads if there isn't much good writing to draw their attention

flit April 25, 2009 at 10:31 AM  

I think the key piece that the original commenter missed was that none of the links to today.com that were in the article actually went to today.com

In Plain English April 25, 2009 at 8:52 PM  

That would mean they actually understood the sarcasm inherent in your post, which clearly, they did not.

Anonymous,  April 27, 2009 at 7:19 PM  

Can we at least agree that there are still some decent bloggers who haven't left? Please??? I support every single blogger who left and continue to visit their new blogs... I just can't decide how to leave. I'm frustrated as heck by Today.com and the lack of support from the moderators, but it's going to take me some time to get up the nerve to abandon all my content. Every time I come to this site, I know I need to get out sooner rather than later.

flit April 27, 2009 at 10:24 PM  

Of course there are.... and most of us are still visiting them.

And will continue to do so if/when they decide they have had enough, or get kicked for having opinions or questions.

In Plain English April 28, 2009 at 12:45 AM  

Absolutely...of course there are bloggers who haven't left who are great! It's the network admins that suck, not the content producers (bloggers). It is just that today.com would rather recruit less talented writers who will give away their work for nothing. We all fell for the scam or we wouldn't feel so strongly about warning others, or at least I know I fell for it.
It's a shame to see such hard working writers get kicked out, locked out and abandoned by today.com. That's the point of this blog, I believe.
It's hard to abandon your blog at today.com, the big problem is they might do it for you without your consent. That's what we're trying to warn people about. Start moving your content, or finding another outlet so that if/when your blog gets shut down, you will have another to fall back on instead of having to start at zero.

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